Schlagwort-Archive: nara

Wikipedia und Archive – Beispiel: National Archives Gender Equality Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Aus der Ankündigung der Veranstaltung im Blog der US National Archives

Come out and join us on Saturday, October 22, 2016 from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm for a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Gender Equality in the Innovation Hub at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Register for this event today!

Gender Equality Edit-a-thon graphic showing Wikipedia logo and Amending America logo

Help us improve Wikipedia entries related to gender equality with the National Archives and Records Administration. You do not need to have prior experience editing Wikipedia. During the event we will have an introduction to editing Wikipedia and a discussion of World War I Nurses and Red Cross records in the National Archives. It will be a lively discussion of women in the Historical record.

This event is part of the Amending America Initiative at the National Archives in celebration of the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights. This event is also co-sponsored with Wikimedia DC and part of DCFemTech’s Tour De Code 2016 and in connection with our celebration of American Archives Month.

Rebooting the Social Media Strategy for the National Archives

Via The National Archives NARAtions:

In six years, you can get a lot done! If you are the International Space Station, you could have orbited the earth 35,040 times. If you are Apple, you could have released 10 new iPhones. If you are the National Archives, you have gone from zero social media accounts to over 100!

It’s been six years since NARA’s first social strategy was released. Things have changed in the digital universe, and so we’ve been working on a reboot of our social media strategy.

In 2010, we introduced our first social media strategy to continue our commitment to open government and to empower staff to use social media. Now our digital presence reaches hundreds of millions of people. More than 200 National Archives staff contribute to 130 social media accounts on 14 different platforms, generating over 250 million views in 2015.

Access and transparency are at the core of our work. With the explosion of digital devices and platforms, we can share our documents and our mission with anyone, anywhere, anytime.

To tackle these new needs and to keep us current for our audiences and stakeholders, we have come up with this new plan. We met with staff and asked them about their goals and needs for social media–and we asked staff what challenges they faced when using social media. We also researched social strategies of other influential institutions, we analyzed our social media and web data, and we read up on best practices. We led lightning sessions to get feedback and suggestions from other galleries, museums, archives, and libraries. Now, we need to hear from you!

Your feedback is needed to make this strategy the best it can be and we want to hear what you think. We see this as a living document, so we’ve published the strategy on GitHub, a collaborative development web platform.

Take a look at the National Archives Social Media Strategy and leave a comment below. Or, send an email to socialmedia@nara.gov and let us know what you think. Please be sure to add your comments by September 16 so we can include your feedback in our plan!